My special needs reads #2

Alright, so I’m back with a list of all things special needs-related I’m reading this week.

I’ve been interested for a while in the suggested link between diet and autism, and while this article’s usage of the word “cure” annoys me, it’s an interesting piece on how there are differences in the bacteria found in the intestines of people with autism, and those who are neuro-typical. It also suggests pro-biotic therapy as something that might one day be an option.

Media is also an important part of how the general community views people with special needs. This article is about a mother and other groups pushing for mediums like advertisements showcasing people with all kinds of abilities. I personally feel it’s going to be a while before this becomes “normal”.

An unfortunate set of incidents I often end up reading about are guardians/parents who end up killing their charge with special needs, and more often than not, kill themselves as well. In response to many people on the internet showing sympathy for the mom who committed the latest murder, Squidalicious has posted a succint piece on the matter. There’s also an audio discussion on the same issue.

This one is a short article, which I found interesting, about a 22-year-old who is pursuing research about the potential link between Down Syndrome and Alzheimers. It’s not a hypothesis I’ve come across before, so it’s interesting to see if this goes anywhere concrete.

There’s a piece that hit closer to home – about the ‘hidden community in autism‘. It’s the set of families that deal with the extreme end of autism – with the biting, the hair pulling, the tantrums, aggression, and much more. It’s not easy to manage, and can scare people if they haven’t seen it before. While there are instances in that post which are more extreme than I’ve ever seen, even Karan sometimes has bouts of tantrums/aggression that aren’t pretty. It’s draining – and I’m not even his caregiver! While the article talks about appropriate services, there aren’t the kind you’d find in the Western countries over here. I think it is important though, that extra help is given to caregivers, as they cannot be expected to look after the autistic person 24/7. Plus, I agree with the article that families with more severe problems get marginalised. Everything is “happy” in the media, but there are those with autism who aren’t going to live “normal” lives. Ever. But people don’t realise that. It frustrates me sometimes to see the side of autism in the media where people are “cured” (BAN that word in relation to autism FFS), where autistics get jobs and earn money and get married. Not all of them reach that stage!

But let’s finish off with this feel-good story about Joshua, who called 911 when his Mom had a bad fall, surprising everyone with his knowledge of what needed to be done. Just goes to show, special needs children absorb a lot of information, even when we’re not sure if they are!

Anyway, that’s all I got this week … till the next time!

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